WONDERS! Water Gushes Out Of Mysterious Tree In FUTO Imo State (PHOTO+VIDEO)

[1] 2
at 01:56 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(2134 | Gistmaniac) (m)

The Federal University of Technology situated in Owerri, Imo state, southeast Nigeria, witnessed what many has described as the unbelievable on February 11, 2015, Wednesday  as  ‘miracle water’ was seen gushing out from a tree around the university bus park.
Below is how one of the students of FUTO, Joyce Chizor Abiaka, who was at the scene described what happened on her Facebook account:
I’m marvelled.
This happened in my school ( Federal University of Technology Owerri) today.

I was walking home with my friends and saw this huge crowd across the road, we decided to go take a look of what was happening and to know why people were carrying empty kegs and bottles towards the crowd. Lo and behold, there was water gushing out from a tree.

Yes! There they were, Nigerians doing what they know how to do best. People started thanking God for the miracle water as it will heal them of all their diseases. The water looking dirty and coloured (I guess that’s what their God can give). Some drank the water, some washed their body with it, some took it home.
What marvelled me most was seeing students from the Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry drink the water.
Phew!

I have nothing else to say, I just hope I don’t hear of the outbreak of cholera, typhoid and so on.

Also, Aniebo Anthony, who wrote for “The Infoscope -FUTO captured the event as follows:

Something unnatural occurred at Federal University of Technology Owerri today 11th February, 2015.

Around 10am today, students and staff of the institution were seen rushing to the site where water (I mean clean water) gushed out from an old tree opposite the All saint’s chapel FUTO.

Most of the students struggled to fetch the water as they believed it was a sign from GOD that FUTO is in the hands of God.


An eye witness who spoke to our team on anonymity said “We saw the water coming out of the tree with full force as if it was being pumped and we all rushed to fetch the water because we believe it was from God”.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N-SHzdoH4I" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win" rel="nofollow">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N-SHzdoH4I</a>

According to a professor in the institution, he said “a big pipe running across that tree may have burst and water due to capillarity rose up the tree and is coming out through the pores of the tree”.

As at the time of filling this report, we are still yet to ascertain where the water came from as many believed it was from God.
We therefore use this medium to urge FUTO students to take things easy and make sure they get their own water from the tree with their jerry cans before it stops flowing.
deboalabi262 at 01:59 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(13002 | Hero) (m)
 Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? miracle water indeed... Lips Sealed

Reply
Ken1230 at 02:09 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(3092 | Gistmaniac) (m)
We hear una. Next
Reply
zeigbo at 02:13 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(27242 | Addicted Hero) (m)
BIAFRA the land of milk n honey

Reply
bayonel3 at 02:15 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(11816 | Hero) (m)
A condition called bacterial wetwood (also called slime flux) is likely to blame. Bacterial wetwood occurs most frequently on elms, maples, poplars, oaks and birches, although it can occur on other trees as well.  Affected trees may leak copious amounts of liquid out of their trunks or branches, discoloring the bark and dripping onto the surrounding ground.
 
Bacterial wetwood occurs as after bacteria infect the wood of a tree. Bacteria can enter the wood through any wound in a trunk, limb or root. Once inside the tree, certain bacteria (called anaerobes) thrive in the low-oxygen environment there. Usually many diverse kinds of anaerobic bacteria are present in an infected tree, living together in a wet mess. They may multiply within the tree for several years unnoticed, and can slowly spread several feet from the initial entry point. As they reproduce, the bacteria produce slimy ooze and methane gas, which builds pressure inside the tree.
 
Pressure builds slowly, and eventually the bacteria are forced out of the tree through the weakest point available, usually near a wound or trunk crotch. The clear to brown bacterial ooze may seep from the tree continually through the growing season, leaving a yellow to brown stain on the bark when it dries.
 
Because the ooze seeping from a tree is full of bacteria, it may smell awful. Other bacteria, fungi, and insects may feed on the ooze once it is outside the tree, contributing to the stench. Often the liquid is toxic to plants, killing grass where it drips. Sometimes the ooze kills the bark where it seeps out, and elms with wetwood often develop yellowed leaves and branch dieback as a result of the toxic liquid.  On many infected trees, though, the foliage appears healthy, and wetwood often does not cause much damage to the rest of the tree.
Reply
echeeche at 02:23 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(9442 | Hero) (m)
Breaking nwes
Reply
dareper at 02:30 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(20441 | Addicted Hero) (m)
God is a biafran
Reply
steveoneal at 02:31 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(3186 | Gistmaniac) (m)
Quote from: bayonel3 on 02:15 PM, 12/02/2015
A condition called bacterial wetwood (also called slime flux) is likely to blame. Bacterial wetwood occurs most frequently on elms, maples, poplars, oaks and birches, although it can occur on other trees as well.  Affected trees may leak copious amounts of liquid out of their trunks or branches, discoloring the bark and dripping onto the surrounding ground.
 
Bacterial wetwood occurs as after bacteria infect the wood of a tree. Bacteria can enter the wood through any wound in a trunk, limb or root. Once inside the tree, certain bacteria (called anaerobes) thrive in the low-oxygen environment there. Usually many diverse kinds of anaerobic bacteria are present in an infected tree, living together in a wet mess. They may multiply within the tree for several years unnoticed, and can slowly spread several feet from the initial entry point. As they reproduce, the bacteria produce slimy ooze and methane gas, which builds pressure inside the tree.
 
Pressure builds slowly, and eventually the bacteria are forced out of the tree through the weakest point available, usually near a wound or trunk crotch. The clear to brown bacterial ooze may seep from the tree continually through the growing season, leaving a yellow to brown stain on the bark when it dries.
 
Because the ooze seeping from a tree is full of bacteria, it may smell awful. Other bacteria, fungi, and insects may feed on the ooze once it is outside the tree, contributing to the stench. Often the liquid is toxic to plants, killing grass where it drips. Sometimes the ooze kills the bark where it seeps out, and elms with wetwood often develop yellowed leaves and branch dieback as a result of the toxic liquid.  On many infected trees, though, the foliage appears healthy, and wetwood often does not cause much damage to the rest of the tree.
Thank you so much, knowledge is power, please tell them.
Reply
kattie77 at 02:41 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(1326 | Gistmaniac) (f)
Quote from: bayonel3 on 02:15 PM, 12/02/2015
A condition called bacterial wetwood (also called slime flux) is likely to blame. Bacterial wetwood occurs most frequently on elms, maples, poplars, oaks and birches, although it can occur on other trees as well.  Affected trees may leak copious amounts of liquid out of their trunks or branches, discoloring the bark and dripping onto the surrounding ground.
 
Bacterial wetwood occurs as after bacteria infect the wood of a tree. Bacteria can enter the wood through any wound in a trunk, limb or root. Once inside the tree, certain bacteria (called anaerobes) thrive in the low-oxygen environment there. Usually many diverse kinds of anaerobic bacteria are present in an infected tree, living together in a wet mess. They may multiply within the tree for several years unnoticed, and can slowly spread several feet from the initial entry point. As they reproduce, the bacteria produce slimy ooze and methane gas, which builds pressure inside the tree.
 
Pressure builds slowly, and eventually the bacteria are forced out of the tree through the weakest point available, usually near a wound or trunk crotch. The clear to brown bacterial ooze may seep from the tree continually through the growing season, leaving a yellow to brown stain on the bark when it dries.
 
Because the ooze seeping from a tree is full of bacteria, it may smell awful. Other bacteria, fungi, and insects may feed on the ooze once it is outside the tree, contributing to the stench. Often the liquid is toxic to plants, killing grass where it drips. Sometimes the ooze kills the bark where it seeps out, and elms with wetwood often develop yellowed leaves and branch dieback as a result of the toxic liquid.  On many infected trees, though, the foliage appears healthy, and wetwood often does not cause much damage to the rest of the tree.
Nice one,thanx for sharing.
Reply
elchymo at 03:02 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(22581 | Addicted Hero) (m)
Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
Reply
Foxtroft at 03:33 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(753 | Upcoming) (m)
Quote from: zeigbo on 02:13 PM, 12/02/2015
BIAFRA the land of milk n honey

Welcome back Zeigbo when were you released from the prison? Hope you enjoyed the place. When are you going to get your miracle water before your brothers finish am?
Reply
zednaijaman at 04:18 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(499 | Upcoming) (m)
Haba, our pursuit of miracles go make us wack s.h.i.t one day walahi
Reply
zednaijaman at 04:22 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(499 | Upcoming) (m)
Haba, our pursuit of miracles go make us wack s.h.i.t one day walahi
Reply
osarobo62 at 04:32 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(11426 | Hero) (m)
what a sad and depressed generation.......wishfully waiting for the miraculous manna from heaven. Sad Sad
Reply
zoe61 at 05:32 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(15333 | Hero) (f)
African ppl with miracle and is killing them slowly
Reply
proly at 05:44 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(14942 | Hero) (f)
Hmmmm mm
Reply
Ukhurebor at 06:23 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(39 | Newbie) (m)
This is what is called uptrust spring. The student of geophysic and geography should tell them
Reply
joromy at 08:22 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(801 | Upcoming) (m)
I BELIEVE WHAT THE PROFESSOR HAS JUST SHARE WITH US THAT IT MAY BE THE WATER PIP THAT PASS UNDER THE TREE HAS BUSTED OTHERS ALTERNATIVE MAY BE THE HAVE WAYS OF STORING WATER DOING RAINNING SEASON,
Reply
Hassymore at 08:47 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(225 | Upcoming) (m)
A condition called bacterial wetwood (also
called slime flux) is likely to blame. Bacterial
wetwood occurs most frequently on elms,
maples, poplars, oaks and birches, although it
can occur on other trees as well. Affected
trees may leak copious amounts of liquid out
of their trunks or branches, discoloring the
bark and dripping onto the surrounding ground.
Bacterial wetwood occurs as after bacteria
infect the wood of a tree. Bacteria can enter
the wood through any wound in a trunk, limb
or root. Once inside the tree, certain bacteria
(called anaerobes) thrive in the low-oxygen
environment there. Usually many diverse kinds
of anaerobic bacteria are present in an infected
tree, living together in a wet mess. They may
multiply within the tree for several years
unnoticed, and can slowly spread several feet
from the initial entry point. As they reproduce,
the bacteria produce slimy ooze and methane
gas, which builds pressure inside the tree.
Pressure builds slowly, and eventually the
bacteria are forced out of the tree through the
weakest point available, usually near a wound
or trunk crotch. The clear to brown bacterial
ooze may seep from the tree continually
through the growing season, leaving a yellow
to brown stain on the bark when it dries.
Because the ooze seeping from a tree is full of
bacteria, it may smell awful. Other bacteria,
fungi, and insects may feed on the ooze once
it is outside the tree, contributing to the
stench. Often the liquid is toxic to plants,
killing grass where it drips. Sometimes the
ooze kills the bark where it seeps out, and
elms with wetwood often develop yellowed
leaves and branch dieback as a result of the
toxic liquid. On many infected trees, though,
the foliage appears healthy, and wetwood often
does not cause much damage to the rest of
the tree.
very nice explanation guy please tell those students to stop drinking the water. omo I say wauuuuu
Reply
beneno at 09:55 PM, 12/02/2015 (3 years ago)
(26112 | Addicted Hero) (m)
 Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
Reply
[1] 2

LATEST COMMENTS

  1. Henrybobo on: Buhari Has Destroyed This Nation Beyond Imagination In Just 3 Years – Charly Boy Slams
    Not a lie... The worst govt in Nigeria history for me... 36 mins ago ago
  2. kp45 on: The World Will Come To An End In 2040 - World Researchers Reveal
    Even Jesus himself don't know except the Almighty God. ... 47 mins ago ago
  3. kp45 on: Curvy Lady Goes On Twitter To Search For Husband (Photo)
    Ok... 53 mins ago ago
  4. kp45 on: I Am Still A Virgin - Nigerian Popular Transgender, Ms Sahhara Reveals On Instagram
    Ok... 54 mins ago ago
  5. Harry12345 on: Daddy Freeze Posted Video Of Pastor Fatoyinbo Asking Students To Sow Seed Of 500k, Celebs Reacte
    I hope you are not antichrist of the word of GOD,because for a preacher to call for sowing of seed i... 57 mins ago ago