some foolish beliefs (Page 5)

Date: 27-03-2012 8:38 pm (10 years ago) | Author: Fred
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- efuro at 28-03-2012 03:45 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
you know what it has been a conventional belief that left hand is as useless as feaces but the two hands help each other
Posted: at 28-03-2012 03:45 PM (10 years ago) | Newbie
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- aso4life1 at 28-03-2012 04:49 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
some dey work ooo lol

Posted: at 28-03-2012 04:49 PM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- goddyaug80 at 28-03-2012 06:35 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
I will lok bk n ask my ancestors wic of dem is rite nor wrong. I rest my case.
Posted: at 28-03-2012 06:35 PM (10 years ago) | Newbie
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- chimax33 at 28-03-2012 07:02 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
Quote from: etiese on 27-03-2012 08:38 PM
I have seen and heard of alot of some belief in Nigeria such as

1. It is abomination to greet, give or take something with ur left hand
2. The person you see first in the morning determines how ur day will be.
3. you fall sick, become poor becos u do not pay tithe.
4. that is you put ur hand on the ground while eating that u can never be full.
 Pls pals wat do you think about this and many others?

[/quote] differentiate your post....

i don't even know which tribe they do any now Huh?Huh??
Posted: at 28-03-2012 07:02 PM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
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- pala88 at 28-03-2012 09:08 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
ruuuuuuubbish. But why u call it footlish. There r many beliefs in di worl and u wont change it. sum ppl belive horoscope, others somethin like u posted. no need to call them foolish. our grand grand graaaaaand parents didnt kno wat we kno now.
Posted: at 28-03-2012 09:08 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
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- FRANKLYNJUDGE at 28-03-2012 09:13 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
POSTER  THE 4TH  ONE  YOU MAKE A MISTAKE  IS BIBLICAL   PAY YOUR  TITHES IN THE HOUSE OF GOD  SO YOUR BARN  WILL FILL, PLEASE DON'T ADD THAT ONE AS AFRICAN OR NIGERIA  CULTURE.  
Posted: at 28-03-2012 09:13 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
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- aliaaz at 28-03-2012 10:03 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
lol

Posted: at 28-03-2012 10:03 PM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
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- osamabinladin at 28-03-2012 10:14 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
poster you will call them foolish belefs because it originated from naija.Pls take your time and go through all this beliefs around the world---
Is Your Family Superstitious?


Did you or your ancestor ever kiss the blarney stone, fear the number 13, or throw salt to ward off evil? There are many interesting superstitions all across the world that have been handed down to us by our forefathers.
 
Many superstitions are shared by various countries. Below, we’ve listed a few that perhaps you hold today, or your ancestors believed at one time. Some of the superstitions listed were recently adopted while others are ancient in origin. There are many more superstitions per country and region than we have listed here, but we’ve highlighted a number of superstitions that we found interesting.
 
Superstitions from North and South America
 
 
 
U.S. Superstitions
 1.Sidewalk Blunders – Don’t step on a crack or you’ll break your mother’s back.
 2.Number 13 – Although the fear of #13 didn’t originate in the United States, there are still buildings without a 13th floor, and apparently row 13 does not exist on many planes flown by Continental Airlines.
 3.Mad Hatter – Placing a hat on your bed is bad luck in South Carolina.
 4.First Meal - In the South, eating black eyed peas on the first day of the year will bring good luck.
 5.A Penny Saved - Find a penny, pick it up, all day long, you’ll have good luck. A penny found heads up will bring good luck.
 6.Pointy Hats – Witches were believed to have lived in Salem, Massachusetts. Between 1692 and 1693, dozens of people were executed because they were believed to be witches.
 
Mexican Superstitions
 1.Unluckily Swept off Your Feet – A single woman may never marry if someone sweeping the floor brushes the maiden’s shoes with the broom.
 
Peruvian Superstitions
 1.Give ‘em the Lazy Eye - If you look at someone that has pinkeye, you’ll get it too.
 2.Cold Drink Anyone? - If you drink something cold or with ice before going to bed, you’ll get sick, and perhaps die.
 3.Is it Hot in Here? – If you sleep with a fan pointed at you, you’ll get sick or die.
 
Superstitions from Asian Countries
 
 
 
Chinese Superstitions
 1.3 + 1 = Not Much Fun – In the Chinese language, the pronunciation for the number 4 is very similar to the pronunciation of the word for death. In the United States and Europe, the number 13 is the “bad” number that is skipped in building floors and other things, the number 4 is treated similarly in China and other countries such as Japan and Korea. FYI: the fear of the number 4 is called tetraphobia.
 
Thai Superstitions
 1.Slithery Dreams – If you dream about a snake tightly holding you, you will soon meet your one and only.
 2.Don’t Roll a Six - The number 6 is said to bring or indicate a reversal of results because the number 6 can be reversed or turned upside down turning it into a different number (number 9 for those who are counting).
 
Taiwanese Superstitions
 1.Show me the Money - Money is burned on behalf of the dead. Official currency is not burned; however, you can purchase special paper money designed for burning.
 
Superstitions from European Countries
 
 
 
English Superstitions
 1.Rap, Tap, Tapping - If a young woman knocks on the door of the hen house and a rooster crows, the young woman will be married within the year. There’s catch, however, the tapping has to take place on Christmas Eve.
 2.With Crust Please – If a person cuts off both ends of a loaf of bread, they need to watch out for flying visitors because it was believed that the Devil would fly over the house.
 3.Savored Salt – If the salt is spilled at the table, take a pinch of it, and throw it over the left shoulder into the eyes of the Devil.
 4.Lean on Me – A newlywed bride should be carried by her husband across the threshold of their new dwelling. Why? To avoid the spirits that linger at the threshold of the door.
 5.Bearable? - If you place a child to ride on the back of a bear, the child will be protected from the whooping-cough sickness.
 6.Hare Raising? – You’ll bring good luck if you say “White Rabbit” on the first day of the month. White rabbits were also believed to be witches.
 
French Superstitions
 1.Nice gift – If you give a set of knives as a wedding gift, the recipients should give you money in return. You’ll then fool the evil spirits into thinking the recipients were purchasing the knives. Why the exchange? The recipients could be otherwise cursed forever.
 
German Superstitions
 1.Lefty - If you lay a newborn on its left side, the baby will will become clumsy later in life.
 2.Dum-Dum - Calling a little child a dummy will hurt the child’s growth.
 3.Ah hem - If it’s raining in the morning, and old women begin clearing their throats, the weather will clear by the afternoon.
 4.Freckles – Want to get rid of those freckles? Try using rainwater left on tombstones.
 
Irish Superstitions
 1.Four-leaf Clover - Surreptitiously finding a four-leaf clover will bring good luck. The four leaflets of the four-leaf clover represent hope, faith, love, and luck.
2.Kissing the Blarney Stone - One who kisses the Blarney stone will be gifted with great eloquence. There are many, many explanations regarding the origins of the stone. It is said that the stone is the famous rock that Moses struck and from which water gushed forth to quench the thirst of the Israelites. It is also said that the patriarch Jacob used the stone as a pillow.
 3.Ye Pot o’ Gold Awaits – Leprechauns are said to live in Ireland. They’re mischievous and rich. If you keep your eye on a leprechaun, the leprechaun cannot escape; however, if you look away for a split second, the leprechaun will vanish.
 
Italian Superstitions
 1.Did You Hear That? – Hanging around a cat with hay fever might be a good idea because it’s good luck to hear a cat sneeze.
 2.Mrs. Peacock – Don’t put peacock feathers in your house because the feathers have the appearance of the “evil eye” within its patterns.
 3.Bridget - Apparently, it is unlucky to see a nun. To ward off the bad luck that might come your way, touch something made of iron.
 
Polish Superstitions
 1.It’s in the Bag - Don’t place your handbag on the floor or else the money inside will disappear.
 
Scottish Superstitions
 1.Flower Power – An old tradition states that a person could use St. John’s Wort flower to get ride of fairies.
 2.Nessie - Loch Ness is home to a monster. It is reported that some triathlon swimmers still get insurance against a monster bite when swimming across Loch Ness.
 3.Blue Suede Anyone? – Even though they may be fancy, don’t you dare put new shoes on your bed or table. This belief stems from the practice of dressing a recently deceased person in new clothes and laying out the body so others can pay their respects.
 
Swedish Superstitions
 1.Troll the Ancient Yule Tide… - Beware to the early riser! Trolls are out and about the countryside in between the rooster crowing and the rising of the sun on Christmas morning.
 2.What’s in your Witches Brew? – Around Easter-time, witches are very active practicing their black magic.
 3.Where are my Keys? – Wherever you place your keys, don’t place them on your table. It brings bad luck.
 
Discovering if Your Ancestors Were Superstitious
 
Your ancestors may or may not have carried the superstitions mentioned above; however, there’s a good way to find out. If your great-grandparents, grandparents, or even parents are still alive, sit down with them (just before Halloween would be appropriate), and ask what superstitions were handed down to them. Ask if they remember any superstitions that their parents or grandparents believed.
 
If your family is less superstitious, you may have to branch out a little bit and ask your uncles and great uncles; there’s usually one or two in the family that have some pretty wild ideas. In ours, we have a Big Foot hunter. Hey, you never know, he may find “Giganto-feet” some day!
 


References:
 
Superstitions from North and South America
 
U.S. Superstitions
 1.
Taught to the author as a child.
 
2.
Check your travel superstitions, or carry them on? (2005, October 31). In USA Today. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.usatoday.com/travel/columnist/grossman/2005-10-31-grossman_x.htm
 
3.
Superstition. (2007, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:22, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Superstition&oldid=163249324
 
4.
Superstition. (2007, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:22, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Superstition&oldid=163249324
 
5.Personal experience. Taught to the author as a child.
 6.
Salem witch trials. (2007, October 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:53, October 14, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Salem_witch_trials&oldid=164340293
 

Mexican Superstitions
 1.
Superstitions: Marriage & Weddings. (no date). In Topics Online Magazine. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.topics-mag.com/internatl/superstitions/marriage.htm
 

Peruvian Superstitions
 1.
Personal experience. Yes, I did get pink eye (or some horrible version of it), and no, I didn’t get it by looking at someone that had it.
 
2.
Communicated to the author by various individuals while in Peru.
 
3.
Communicated to the author while in Peru.
 

Superstitions from Asian Countries
 
Chinese Superstitions
 1.
Superstition. (2007, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:22, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Superstition&oldid=163249324
 

Thai Superstitions
 1.
Superstitions from Thailand. (no date). In TOPICS Online Magazine. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://www.topics-mag.com/internatl/superstitions/thailand.htm
 
2.
Superstitions from Thailand. (no date). In TOPICS Online Magazine. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://www.topics-mag.com/internatl/superstitions/thailand.htm
 

Taiwanese Superstitions
 1.Personal observation by the author while in Taiwan.
 
Superstitions from European Countries
 
English Superstitions
 1.
Text Examples for Superstitions. (no date). In Thank You Ink. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.thankyouink.com/textdisplay.php?display=type&sortname=superstitions
 
2.
Superstitions. (no date). In Historic-UK.com. Retrieved October 9, 2007 from
 http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Superstitions.htm

 3.
Superstitions. (no date). In Historic-UK.com. Retrieved October 9, 2007 from
 http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Superstitions.htm

 4.
Superstitions. (no date). In Historic-UK.com. Retrieved October 9, 2007 from
 http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Superstitions.htm

 5.
Superstitions in Britain. (no date). In British Life and Culture, Woodlands Junior School, Kent. Retrieved on October 10, 2007 from http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/superstitions.htm
 
6.
Superstitions in Britain. (no date). In British Life and Culture, Woodlands Junior School, Kent. Retrieved on October 10, 2007 from http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/superstitions.htm
 

French Superstitions
 1.
French Superstitions. (2004, October 31). In La Coquette. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://lacoquette.blogs.com/la_coquette/2004/10/french_supersti.html
 

German Superstitions
 1.
Superstitions from Europe. (1998, January 11). In http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html
 
2.
Superstitions from Europe. (1998, January 11). In http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html
 
3.
Superstitions from Europe. (1998, January 11). In http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html
 
4.
Superstitions from Europe. (1998, January 11). In http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/superstition.html
 

Irish Superstitions
 1.
Four-leaf clover. (2007, September 30). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:08, October 9, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Four-leaf_clover&oldid=161328403
 
2.
Blarney Stone. (2007, October 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:20, October 9, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Blarney_Stone&oldid=162288524
 
3.
Leprechaun. (2007, October 7). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:44, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Leprechaun&oldid=162911086
 

Italian Superstitions
 1.
Italian Superstitions. (2001, August 3). In suite101.com. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_culture/76486
 
2.
Italian Superstitions. (2001, August 3). In suite101.com. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_culture/76486
 
3.
Italian Superstitions. (2001, August 3). In suite101.com. Retrieved October 10, 2007, from http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_culture/76486
 

Polish Supersitions
 
 
 1.Very Superstitious. (2002, March 24). In The Warsaw Voice. Retrieved October 13, 2007 from http://www.warsawvoice.pl/archiwum.phtml/11684/

Scottish Superstitions
 1.
Scottishs Folklore and Folklife. (no date). In Tour Scotland. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.fife.50megs.com/scots-folklore.htm
 
2.
Scottish superstitions. (2006, January 31). In Scottish Blog. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.scottish-heirloom.com/scottish-blog/index.php/2006/01/31/scottish_superstitions
 
3.
Superstition. (2007, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:22, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Superstition&oldid=163249324
 

Swedish Superstitions
 1.
Text Examples for Superstitions. (no date). In Thank You Ink. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.thankyouink.com/textdisplay.php?display=type&sortname=superstitions
 
2.
Traditions around Easter…. (no date). In http://www.luth.se/luth/present/sweden/history/folklore/easter.html. Retrieved October 9, 2007, from http://www.luth.se/luth/present/sweden/history/folklore/easter.html
 
3.
Superstition. (2007, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:22, October 10, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Superstition&oldid=163249324

Posted: at 28-03-2012 10:14 PM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- ILOVEIT at 28-03-2012 11:17 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
Quote from: FlyMamacita on 28-03-2012 10:02 AM
Where is it in Western world children greet their parents by name ?

abeg ask him again oo!

Posted: at 28-03-2012 11:17 PM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- Larrykingomoj at 29-03-2012 02:14 AM (10 years ago)
(m)
It does not work, it is superstitous
Posted: at 29-03-2012 02:14 AM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
Reply
- Senegal at 29-03-2012 02:47 AM (10 years ago)
(m)
Don't you know what is right?
Posted: at 29-03-2012 02:47 AM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- deboalabi262 at 29-03-2012 03:01 AM (10 years ago)
(m)
Tell these to the birds.....

Posted: at 29-03-2012 03:01 AM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- ozonadakar at 29-03-2012 03:54 AM (10 years ago)
(m)
it depends on d family sha..

 we have never believed such tradition in my family'

it has nothing to do with you family tradition, 1 thing i know is that, to take or give some tin wit left hand means that u have no respect at all to elders.
Posted: at 29-03-2012 03:54 AM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
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- donuche at 29-03-2012 05:27 AM (10 years ago)
(m)
Quote from: jossy4reall on 27-03-2012 08:55 PM
I think dat what u believe works for u................ but dat ur No1 is not abomination but a kind of showing respect to ur fellow human,..especially sum1 older dan u



well said
Posted: at 29-03-2012 05:27 AM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
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- Bettygirls at 29-03-2012 12:55 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
what ever u believe works for u,not only in nigeria
Posted: at 29-03-2012 12:55 PM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
Reply
- Neglito at 29-03-2012 04:33 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
Lack of Education
Posted: at 29-03-2012 04:33 PM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
Reply
- Beauti4 at 29-03-2012 04:40 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
But some Abokis wey no school still dey better than those wey be Educationist.
Posted: at 29-03-2012 04:40 PM (10 years ago) | Hero
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- hazzycute at 29-03-2012 05:51 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
SOME TIME ALL THIS THEIR F**KIN TRADITION STUFF MAKE SENCE
Posted: at 29-03-2012 05:51 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
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- TEEJAYCOOL01 at 29-03-2012 08:20 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
YOU CALL IT "some foolish beliefs" SO WHAT DO YOU WANT ME TO SAY...... CHANGE THE TITTLE AND RE POST IT, IF YOU REALLY WANT TO LEARN
Posted: at 29-03-2012 08:20 PM (10 years ago) | Newbie
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- ifeness at 30-03-2012 01:58 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
 ALL BELIEFS ARE FALSE

 The so called God mind is always neutral,it allows you to espress yourself the way you want.

 Traditions,beliefs and religions are all man made. They never solve human problems
Posted: at 30-03-2012 01:58 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
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