No apologies over anti-gay marriage law –FG

Date: 09-12-2011 4:42 pm (10 years ago) | Author: dammy rose
- at 9-12-2011 04:42 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
No apologies over anti-gay marriage law –FG
From JULIANA TAIWO-OBALONYE, Abuja

Thursday, December 8, 2011
The Federal Government, in response to President Barack Obama of the United States of America’s Presidential Memorandum directing “all federal agencies engaged abroad to ensure that U.S. diplomacy and foreign assistance promote and protect the human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisegxwal, and Transgender (LGBT) persons”, has said that as an independent nation, it has no apologies for laws that preserve her values and culture.


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Fielding questions from State House correspondents who sought to know if the issue came up in yesterday’s Federal Executive Council (FEC), the Minister of Information, Labaran Maku said, though it was still a proposed law that has only be considered by the Senate and yet to be considered by the House of Representstives, he insisted that Nigeria as an independent country, reserves the right to make laws without apologies to other countries. Adding “at any rate, between Europe, America and Africa there is a huge culture gap, some of the things that are considered fundamental rights abroad, also can be very offensive to African culture, tradition and to the way we live our lives here”.

Maku, who admitted some of the comments coming from foreign partners and friends are worrisome, added that though the President’s position will come if he assents to the law or not, added that “Nigeria’s democracy will be guarded by Nigeria’s interests and values” and that as “independent nation our legislature has the right to legislate and discuss any matter in the world that comes before them that is also in tune with the welfare of the people of Nigeria.”

According to Maku, “The reported comments by the US Government about the proposed law by the Senate about same sex marriage in Nigeria has not fully come to government for a position. But let me say this, we live in a democracy, we live in a free country, we live in an independent country. And in every democracy as you know, there are institutions, there are laws and also there are cultures, there are beliefs and values in every nation.

“Relating to the law that is being proposed by the Senate, as you know Senate has passed a version of a law relating to same sex marriages, that law has not yet gone through House of Representatives not to talk of becoming a law that will be forwarded to the President for assent.

“It is a process that is going on normally through the Nigeian legislature, the same way every law is passed in every democracy, we have not reached that point where it has become law. But even if it has become law, as you do know, Nigeria reserves the right as an independent nation to live under laws that are democratically passed by the National Assembly. If in the end it becomes law, it will become the law of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, if the President assent to it, it will become law, if it doesn’t then if the National Assembly is able to muster two-third majority to pass it into law, it becomes law. But we are still far from what the Senate has done becoming law.

“Having said this, I believe our institutions are clear, we live in a democracy. Foreign countries that may not be happy with certain aspects of laws passed in Nigeria, are free to express their views concerning whatever law that is passed through the Nigerian legislature but at the same time all those countries know how democracies work.

“Like I said, the federal government has not yet come to a point of commenting on it because is a legislative process that pass through just one of the bi-cameral legislatures in Nigeria, if it eventually becomes law I’m sure the President will have a position on the matter. But until then, it is very premature for us to discuss what is still going on in the National Assembly.

“But let me make the point clear, our country is an independent country, we reserve the right to make our laws without apologies to other countries. But at any rate, between Europe, America and Africa there is a huge culture gap, some of the things that are considered fundamental rights abroad, also can be very offensive to African culture, tradition and to the way we live our lives here. I said this has not become a law, but sometimes we get worried by comments that are made.

The truth of the matter is, our democracy will be guarded by Nigeria’s interest and values. And if eventually the law becomes law, we will live with it but it is not yet law. And we will take comments by our foreign partners and friends as legitimate but I also know that it is with the legitimate rights of Nigeria as an independent nation and our legislature to legislate and discuss any matter in the world that comes before them that is also in tune with the welfare of the people of Nigeria,” he said.


 

Posted: at 9-12-2011 04:42 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
- rakelly at 9-12-2011 04:48 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
ok i will run to USA then
Posted: at 9-12-2011 04:48 PM (10 years ago) | Hero
Reply
- rayOFsunshine at 9-12-2011 05:02 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
Gbam!
Posted: at 9-12-2011 05:02 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
Reply
- kebella at 9-12-2011 05:03 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
ok

Posted: at 9-12-2011 05:03 PM (10 years ago) | Addicted Hero
Reply
- ronky at 9-12-2011 05:09 PM (10 years ago)
(f)
it shows dat naija is mouthd
Posted: at 9-12-2011 05:09 PM (10 years ago) | Upcoming
Reply
- Ajento at 9-12-2011 08:07 PM (10 years ago)
(m)
Good to know.
Posted: at 9-12-2011 08:07 PM (10 years ago) | Gistmaniac
Reply